Through adversity there is the un conquered light of human spirit.  The ability to keep going through the challenges of life and to find light in the dark.  This collection celebrates the subtle and not so subtle elements of what it means to be human and the complexity this entails.  Human spirit is the connection that keeps us thriving in existence and unifies us when un certainty looms and takes control of our lives.   Love, friendship, loss and suffering are just some of the issues covered in this collection.    

Jean and Sid - Love through the ages

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D-Day veteran Sid and his wife Jean have been married for 66 years. A former Royal Marine, Sid left service after the war and met Jean in a dance hall in Coventry. After meeting up a few times, they decided to get married. Shortly after their wedding in 1948, Sid decided to build a house in the Tile Hill area of Coventry and they’ve been living there ever since, raising two sons in the process.  Sid is now 94 and Jean is 88 but they are still mobile and up until their late 70s were both still travelling. "We've been all over the place," stated Sid. On their Diamond Wedding Anniversary in 2008, they received a card from Her Majesty the Queen. "We've been through a lot. I pretty much lost all of my family in the war and Jean came along and gave me a new life," added Sid.  Asked what the key to a long marriage is Jean stated, with a smile on her face, "Tolerance!"

Every step counts

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On 25th April 2015, Nepal was hit by the largest earthquake in over 20 years, killing 8,000 people and injuring over 22,000. An additional 2.5 million people were left homeless and many are still living in temporary housing.  With a new constitution and a prolonged fuel crisis affecting the country, work to rebuild many of the homes damaged in the quake has been delayed. Nepal was already one of the poorest countries in the world and the aftermath of the earthquake has had a devastating and prolonged impact in many rural areas across the Kathmandu Valley. Uma Silwal, 18 lives in a village called Godawari, high about the city in the Kathmandu Valley.  “We used to have a farm house which has been in our family for four generations.   My mother works the home and my father retired after a career in the fire service.  We lived a quiet life.”  Comments Uma on life before the earthquake. “We felt the ground shake and we ran.  My brother was ahead of me.  The wall to the cow shed collapsed.  I was trapped under it.  Umesh took my hand and my family pulled me out.  I don’t remember much after that, just the pain.  I was taken to hospital and I woke up feeling like something was different.  My leg had been taken away.”  

“Mandeera Bajracharya (19) knows all about me. She is my best friend.  I tell her everything.  I don’t want to be treated differently to the other pupils, so it’s better for me to hide it. If they go trekking they won’t ask me to come along, and I don’t want that. I can do the same as everyone else, just in a different way.”